FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS -FAQs

BEFORE TRAVELLING TO SRI LANKA

1 - Practical packing


Get practical in preselecting your clothes at least one week before you leave for you to get a better idea of what you absolutely need or even forget.

Beware of overload packing of things you didn’t wear for ages or even need during your time here. Be objective on what exactly you will need and be comfortable to wear and carry with you during your trip

Due to the extreme difference of temperature & climate you could encounter during your adventure, we highly recommend bringing synthetic & fast drying material clothes (if rain, cotton fabric won’t dry so quickly).




2 - Clothing Pack-Up


Rain jacket or poncho, rain pants, light trekking pants, good hiking boots (Salomon X Trail type – light and fast to dry), pair of sleepers, short sleeved light shirts, long sleeved light shirt, 3-4 pairs of football/hiking socks, 2-3 shorts or zip off pants, 1 sweat shirt (for the cool night), 1 extra pair of comfortable shoes, underwear, lightweight sleepwear, swimsuit




3 - Others Things Pack-Up


A compact umbrella, one waterproof cover for your backpack, one small dry bag for your documents and mobile phone, headlamp & small flashlight (usb chargeable will be more efficient), sun hat, quick dry hand towel, outlet adaptor, mobile phone charger, sunglasses (with UV protection), Contact lenses & prescription glasses (if you wear any)




4 - Toileterie & Medical Pack-Up


Your personal treatment (if you follow any), first aid kit (betatine, anti-bacterial gel, antiseptic cream, oral rehydration salts, medicinal charcoal, panadol, cough syrup, non woven swab, handsaplast, strap, adhesive plaster, cotton leafs, eyes cleaner), insect repellent and anti-itch ointment, mosquito spray (tropical level), suncream, after-sun cream, Lip Balm (if you have lips sensitive), mini tissue packs (very dusty air), ear plugs (if you are a light sleeper), deodorant, aromatic soap




5 - Photography Gear Pack-Up


Camera(s), lens(es), Go Pro, polarizing filter(s), tripod, lens cleaners/cloths, battery charger(s), extra batteries, extention power strips, extra memory cards, storm camera cover, waterproof camera bag/lens(es), binocular

Don’t forget your lens 300mm minimum for you to snap-shot splendid wildlife/bird all the way of your expedition




6 - Electrical Current & Plug?


You’ll need three kinds of electrical plugs (D, M & G), the D is the most common used. Some rooms have outlets for all three plugs, but sometimes only the D. If you’re holding the wrong plug and you are in Colombo, you can find the right adapter at Pettah market, where there are a bunch of electrical stores with bins full of them. The shopkeepers will even test them for you before you buy. The very best will be you buy prior your departure one international adaptor and bring along with you a multiple plugs extention for you to be able to connect all your devices in the same time





ADVENTURE PACKING ADVICE

1 - Practical packing


Get practical in preselecting your clothes at least one week before you leave for you to get a better idea of what you absolutely need or even forget.

Beware of overload packing of things you didn’t wear for ages or even need during your time here. Be objective on what exactly you will need and be comfortable to wear and carry with you during your trip

Due to the extreme difference of temperature & climate you could encounter during your adventure, we highly recommend bringing synthetic & fast drying material clothes (if rain, cotton fabric won’t dry so quickly).




2 - Clothing Pack-Up


Rain jacket or poncho, rain pants, light trekking pants, good hiking boots (Salomon X Trail type – light and fast to dry), pair of sleepers, short sleeved light shirts, long sleeved light shirt, 3-4 pairs of football/hiking socks, 2-3 shorts or zip off pants, 1 sweat shirt (for the cool night), 1 extra pair of comfortable shoes, underwear, lightweight sleepwear, swimsuit




3 - Others Things Pack-Up


A compact umbrella, one waterproof cover for your backpack, one small dry bag for your documents and mobile phone, headlamp & small flashlight (usb chargeable will be more efficient), sun hat, quick dry hand towel, outlet adaptor, mobile phone charger, sunglasses (with UV protection), Contact lenses & prescription glasses (if you wear any)




4 - Toileterie & Medical Pack-Up


Your personal treatment (if you follow any), first aid kit (betatine, anti-bacterial gel, antiseptic cream, oral rehydration salts, medicinal charcoal, panadol, cough syrup, non woven swab, handsaplast, strap, adhesive plaster, cotton leafs, eyes cleaner), insect repellent and anti-itch ointment, mosquito spray (tropical level), suncream, after-sun cream, Lip Balm (if you have lips sensitive), mini tissue packs (very dusty air), ear plugs (if you are a light sleeper), deodorant, aromatic soap




5 - Photography Gear Pack-Up


Camera(s), lens(es), Go Pro, polarizing filter(s), tripod, lens cleaners/cloths, battery charger(s), extra batteries, extention power strips, extra memory cards, storm camera cover, waterproof camera bag/lens(es), binocular

Don’t forget your lens 300mm minimum for you to snap-shot splendid wildlife/bird all the way of your expedition




6 - Electrical Current & Plug?


You’ll need three kinds of electrical plugs (D, M & G), the D is the most common used. Some rooms have outlets for all three plugs, but sometimes only the D. If you’re holding the wrong plug and you are in Colombo, you can find the right adapter at Pettah market, where there are a bunch of electrical stores with bins full of them. The shopkeepers will even test them for you before you buy. The very best will be you buy prior your departure one international adaptor and bring along with you a multiple plugs extention for you to be able to connect all your devices in the same time





WHILE ON TOUR

1 - Culture & Belief


One distinctive feature of Sri Lankan culture is the way in which ethnicity, language and religious affiliation correlate with one another, each being key determinants of an individual’s identity. Alongside the two largest ethnic groups – Sinhalese (74.9%) and Tamil (15.4%) – the third largest ethnic group is Sri Lankan Moors (9.2%). The remaining 0.5% of Sri Lanka’s population is comprised of Burghers (mixed European descent), Parsis (immigrants from west India) and Veddas (who are identified as the indigenous inhabitants of the land). The Tamils separate further into two groups, Sri Lankan Tamils and Indian Tamils.

Ethnicity and religion are often closely linked in Sri Lanka. In fact, one’s religion is often able to be interpreted from their ethnicity. More specifically, 70.2% of the population identify as Buddhist and are typically of Sinhalese ethnicity, while those who identify as Hindu (12.6%) tend to be ethnically Tamil. Although those who identify as Muslim (9.7%) come from various backgrounds (most being Sri Lankan Moors), they are commonly recognised as a single populace in Sri Lankan society.

The prevalence of Buddhism in Sri Lanka tends to reinforce the dominance of the Sinhalese majority. The Sinhalese elites and parts of the Buddhist Sangha who support Sinhala Buddhist nationalism argue that Sri Lanka is the ‘Dhamma Kingdom’ – the land of Buddhism.

There are three official languages of Sri Lanka: Sinhala, Tamil and English




2 - Can / Can't Do


Using Your Hands in Sri Lanka

Like many people in the world, Sri Lankans don't use cutlery, instead eating with the fingertips on their right hand. For travelers who don't want to do the same, most restaurants will offer cutlery if you ask politely. But don't cause a fuss – join in the fun!

It's polite to use your right hand when shaking hands or handing money and small objects to someone else. Of course, you can use both hands for something large and heavy.

Respecting Buddhist Culture in Sri Lanka

Buddhism is the main faith in Sri Lanka, and more than 70% of the population is Buddhist. The remaining population follow Hinduism, Islam or Christianity.

Never touch or pat the top of the head of a Buddhist monk, including young children at temples. As religious leaders of the community, they are to be respected.

Do not turn your back to (or be alongside) a statue of Buddha that is nearby. If in doubt, look at the behavior of the locals around you. This includes posing for photos; it's okay to take a photo of a statue, but anyone in the photo should be facing Buddha, not standing beside or with their back to the statue.

Don't wear any clothing that features Buddha or any other deity. It might be considered disrespectful and insensitive, could incur the wrath of authorities, possibly leading to arrest.

Always be polite to monks, offer them a seat if you're on a crowded bus (unless you're elderly or disabled). If you're entering a temple, cover your shoulders and legs, and remove footwear and headwear before heading inside. The same attire rules apply to Hindu temples. You should also, always remove your shoes before entering someone's home.

Social Etiquette Tips in Sri Lanka

Public displays of affection (PDA), such as kissing and/or hugging, may be frowned upon. In Sri Lanka, PDA is considered to be private behavior but is generally acceptable at functions and establishments for adults (such as nightclubs, casinos and beach parties). Allowances are made for travelers, and holding hands and affection between parents and their children are allowed.

Public nudity is illegal in Sri Lanka. So, if you were hoping to skinny dip and sunbathe nude or topless, stick to the private beach resorts which allow it (but ask first to avoid embarrassment).

LGBTQ travelers should be aware that same-sex relations are still illegal in Sri Lanka.

Our best advice? Behave as the locals do, learning from them is the best way to avoid offending someone, and potentially getting into trouble.




3 - Electronic Devices Right?


Be cautious when operating Drones! You must Obtain requisite approval for operating any Drones devises anywhere in the island (Operations of Drones in Sri Lanka requires approval from the Civil Aviation Authority of Sri Lanka. For details of the requirements,




4 - Should I bring gifts to give along the way?


We discourage indiscriminate gift giving on our trips. Generally a smile and a respectful attitude are the best gifts you can give. We strongly discourage giving out candy, toys, or pens to children as this can develop a beggar mentality.





WHAT I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SRI LANKA

1 - Culture & Belief


One distinctive feature of Sri Lankan culture is the way in which ethnicity, language and religious affiliation correlate with one another, each being key determinants of an individual’s identity. Alongside the two largest ethnic groups – Sinhalese (74.9%) and Tamil (15.4%) – the third largest ethnic group is Sri Lankan Moors (9.2%). The remaining 0.5% of Sri Lanka’s population is comprised of Burghers (mixed European descent), Parsis (immigrants from west India) and Veddas (who are identified as the indigenous inhabitants of the land). The Tamils separate further into two groups, Sri Lankan Tamils and Indian Tamils.

Ethnicity and religion are often closely linked in Sri Lanka. In fact, one’s religion is often able to be interpreted from their ethnicity. More specifically, 70.2% of the population identify as Buddhist and are typically of Sinhalese ethnicity, while those who identify as Hindu (12.6%) tend to be ethnically Tamil. Although those who identify as Muslim (9.7%) come from various backgrounds (most being Sri Lankan Moors), they are commonly recognised as a single populace in Sri Lankan society.

The prevalence of Buddhism in Sri Lanka tends to reinforce the dominance of the Sinhalese majority. The Sinhalese elites and parts of the Buddhist Sangha who support Sinhala Buddhist nationalism argue that Sri Lanka is the ‘Dhamma Kingdom’ – the land of Buddhism.

There are three official languages of Sri Lanka: Sinhala, Tamil and English




2 - Can / Can't Do


Using Your Hands in Sri Lanka

Like many people in the world, Sri Lankans don't use cutlery, instead eating with the fingertips on their right hand. For travelers who don't want to do the same, most restaurants will offer cutlery if you ask politely. But don't cause a fuss – join in the fun!

It's polite to use your right hand when shaking hands or handing money and small objects to someone else. Of course, you can use both hands for something large and heavy.

Respecting Buddhist Culture in Sri Lanka

Buddhism is the main faith in Sri Lanka, and more than 70% of the population is Buddhist. The remaining population follow Hinduism, Islam or Christianity.

Never touch or pat the top of the head of a Buddhist monk, including young children at temples. As religious leaders of the community, they are to be respected.

Do not turn your back to (or be alongside) a statue of Buddha that is nearby. If in doubt, look at the behavior of the locals around you. This includes posing for photos; it's okay to take a photo of a statue, but anyone in the photo should be facing Buddha, not standing beside or with their back to the statue.

Don't wear any clothing that features Buddha or any other deity. It might be considered disrespectful and insensitive, could incur the wrath of authorities, possibly leading to arrest.

Always be polite to monks, offer them a seat if you're on a crowded bus (unless you're elderly or disabled). If you're entering a temple, cover your shoulders and legs, and remove footwear and headwear before heading inside. The same attire rules apply to Hindu temples. You should also, always remove your shoes before entering someone's home.

Social Etiquette Tips in Sri Lanka

Public displays of affection (PDA), such as kissing and/or hugging, may be frowned upon. In Sri Lanka, PDA is considered to be private behavior but is generally acceptable at functions and establishments for adults (such as nightclubs, casinos and beach parties). Allowances are made for travelers, and holding hands and affection between parents and their children are allowed.

Public nudity is illegal in Sri Lanka. So, if you were hoping to skinny dip and sunbathe nude or topless, stick to the private beach resorts which allow it (but ask first to avoid embarrassment).

LGBTQ travelers should be aware that same-sex relations are still illegal in Sri Lanka.

Our best advice? Behave as the locals do, learning from them is the best way to avoid offending someone, and potentially getting into trouble.




3 - Electronic Devices Right?


Be cautious when operating Drones! You must Obtain requisite approval for operating any Drones devises anywhere in the island (Operations of Drones in Sri Lanka requires approval from the Civil Aviation Authority of Sri Lanka. For details of the requirements,




4 - Should I bring gifts to give along the way?


We discourage indiscriminate gift giving on our trips. Generally a smile and a respectful attitude are the best gifts you can give. We strongly discourage giving out candy, toys, or pens to children as this can develop a beggar mentality.





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